Sports Physician - Athlete 1938

1938

American figure skater Tim Brown (1938-1989) won two silver medals at World Championships and finished four times second at the American championships. He finished fifth at the 1960 Winter Olympics in Squaw Valley. Due to illness, he could not participate at World Cup one year later and ironically, the flu attack saved his life, because the entire American team was killed in a plane crash in the vicinity of Brussels. Brown also did ice dancing with his compatriot Susan Sebo (1936-2014), where he finished third in the American championship of 1958. At the University of California Berkeley he graduated in zoology, but he continued his studies and obtained his medical degree and established himself as a general practitioner. In 1989 he died from the consequences of AIDS.

1938

Dutchman Marius Klumperbeek (1938-) was the helmsman of the coxed four at the 1960 Olympics in Rome and he won the bronze medal at the Tokyo Olympics. After he graduated in Leiden, he established himself as a general practitioner.

1938

New Zealander Peter Snell (1938-) became famous for the fact that he beated Belgian top favorite Roger Moens (1930-) in the 800m at the 1960 Olympics in Rome. At the beginning of the last straight line, Moens peered over his right shoulder for the competition, but just that moment Snell ran past him on the left and won. Four years later in Tokyo he renewed his Olympic title with a new world record, but he was also the best on the 1.500m. In 1962 he broke the world record on the miles. In total he broke the world record five times. But in 1965, at the height of his career, he announced his retirement. Snell initially worked for a tobacco company, but emigrated in 1972 to the United States for an education Human Performance training, after which he completed a Ph.D. got into the Exercise Physiology. The Southwestern Medical Center of the University of Texas attracted him as a scientist and became assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and Director of their Human Performance Center.

1938

Australian David Theile (1938) won the 100m backstroke at the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne in 1.02.2, a new world record. Four years later in Rome he defended his title successfully and he also won the silver  medal 4 x 100m medley with the Australian team. During the first round some officials had comments about his turning point and they asked him for a demonstration which he refused.
To prepare himself optimally for the Melbourne Games, he had even postponed his medical studies. He graduated in 1962 and specialized in Surgery, practicing at the Princess Alexandra Hospital of Brisbane


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