Sports Physician - Athlete 1958

1958

American Eric Heiden (1958-) won five gold medals at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid and he established a new Olympic record on each of those five distances. He was the first athlete to win five individual events at the same Olympics. Four years earlier at the age of 17 he already participated in the Winter Olympics in Innsbruck. He also became three times world champion all-round and four times world champion sprint. He improved the world record of the 1,000 meters three times, twice that of the 3,000 meters and once the 1,500 and 10,000 meters. During his career he also improved the world records of both the big quad camp and the sprint quad. He was the leader of the Adelskalender for 1,495 days and he won the Oscar Mathisen Award four times in a row. In 1980 he became the best American Amateur athlete with the James E. Sullivan Award. In 1986 he stopped skating and he participated in the Tour de France as a rider of the 7-Eleven team. He graduated from Stanford University and specialized in Orthopedic Surgery at University of California, Davis, and in Sports Medicine at a sports medicine clinic in Birmingham, Alabama. He returned to California to practice as an orthopedic surgeon in Sacramento. At that time, he served as team physician for the basketball teams Sacramento Kings and Sacramento Monarchs. In 2002, 2006, 2010 and 2014 he was the team physician for the US Olympic speed skating team. .

1958

The rowing career of German Michael Sauer (1958-) started at the age of 12 at Mannheimer Ruderclub 1875 eV.. At the age of 18 he lost his lower leg in a motorcycle accident, but he rowed with a prosthesis and in 2007 he won the world championship in the coxed foure. One year later, that boat finished fourth on the Paralympics in Beijing. He studied Medicine at the Universit├Ąt Heidelberg and the Universit├Ąt Mannheim and specialized in Orthopedic Surgery.

1958

Terry Schroeder (1958-) was captain of the American Olympic water polo team in 1984, 1988 and 1992 and with ten goals he led his teammates to the silver medal in 1984 and 1988. In 1979, 1983 and 1987 he won the gold medal with the national seven in the Pan American Games. He trained the water polo team at the University of Pepperdine and from 2007 he became head coach of the American men's team. He graduated as a medical doctor, specialized in Sports Medicine at the Pepperdine University in Malibu and in 1986 he was promoted as a Chiropractor at the Palmer University in Davenport, Iowa. In this last specialization, another 59 family members were active. He did not only take care of his own teammates, but also opponents.

1958

Dutchman Tom van 't Hek (1958-) played field hockey at the highest level. He was called 221 times for the Dutch team and scored 106 goals. In 1985 he won the title with Kampong in the main class. After graduating in 1992, he settled as a general practitioner, but in 1994 he returned to hockey as the national coach of the women's team. With these ladies he won the European title in 1995, the bronze medal at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, the silver medal at the 1998 World Cup and the bronze medal at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. After that sport career he became a radio reporter.

1958

Andreas Weniger (1958-) became German champion street run over 25 km in 1981. The following year he finished third in the German marathon championships and he won the 'Rund um den Baldeneysee', the Essen marathon. He also triumphed four times in the Silvesterlauf Gersthofen. After graduating, he specialized in Sports Medicine and opened a practice in Diedorf near Augsburg.


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